Archive for the ‘Marketing Analytics’ Category

The Broken World of Marketing Data Sciences

dilbert

Do you know why the world of marketing has a response rate of 2-3% and is happy with it? Even lesser? It is because the world of marketing data and marketing data sciences is broken. And marketers don’t know a way around it.

Here’s what the data looks like typically-

  • Market Research & Panel data – For decades, marketers have been happy dealing with panel data that fulfills what they believe in. Like the huge TG for their product and innovation. So much so, that it takes years of business disasters in a row for a Nokia to understand how things have changed. But Panel Data is at best a coarse approximation. The sampling is flawed 9 out of 10 times. Flawed. I am not even talking about biases. Or, fraudulent data entry.
  • Focus Groups – Less said the better. The FGDs are not representative (by design), the insights are more often than not an accident, and there is a serious dearth of good marketers capable of running half-decent and probing focus groups. What you can usually depend on here, though, is something which is unanimously panned or applauded. Like the Kala Bandar (Black Monkey) of Delhi 6 (the movie).
  • Test & Control Groups – Several practitioners have lost their voices screaming about the need for quality T&CG setup. The only real deal here, to some extent, was the world of database marketing. Unfortunately, DBMs believed a little too much in their potential, and focused less on their improvement areas, a problem that often accompanies success.
  • POS/Warehouse Data – Logged in/ loyalty customers is what we are capable of tracking, they’d tell you. And can they track you across your properties? Their properties? Households? Don’t they have the data already? And what about the other data elements? How good are they? What about that graph model thing?
  • Big Data – Lets mine social media, twitter sentiments, facebook posts, and let us use key opinion leaders and influencers, and viral content. And we will have machine learning for real time recommendations and offers. And… I know. I believe in the possibilities. But do you really understand it? Where does it even begin?

What this has, sequentially, led to, is –

  • Lack of trust in the data – an obvious side effect, won’t you think?
  • Rise of Witch Doctors –People with creative halos, learned expressions, snob behavior, and/or a “heightened sense” of what the consumers want. The primary reason why you’d trust them – because they tell you so. And, because you have no alternate version.
  • A Kodak Moment – All traditional data providers are getting destroyed by Google, Facebook, Inmobi and the likes. These companies have brought “attribution” and measurement to the center of the discussion.

There has been, therefore, a dearth of high quality and effective use of marketing data. Take for instance, Amazon. It’s a data-science influenced company. Yet, what you get to see on the landing page tells you how broken the listings/ recommendation algorithms are. And they’ve been playing with it for a while. Flipkart fares much worse. The others are not even talking about it or worth talking about. Offline retailers have little good data. Brand managers work with incorrect data most of the time (or trade data). Yet, conversations about analytics and big data makes for good headlines.

Nevertheless, there are few philosophical departures, none too easy, to keep pressing forward.

  • Invest in data – Most companies need a multichannel data play, common denominators across platforms, and investments in “data collection”. It’s long, tough and they don’t have the right focus or resources to do it.
  • Improve data quality – Data needs to become a constant companion in every discussion. Across HR, Finance, Legal, Admin, Marketing, Sales, Strategy. Any investment in that direction would, today, mean creating hundreds of cross-walks, resolving inconsistencies, requiring layers of data cleansing, and finally, standardizing the definitions. It would be, for most companies, a journey of at least 12 months if they are smart, ambitious and ruthless. Ruthlessness is the key.
  • Data in the front office – One recurring funny moment in every consultants’ and analytics professionals’ life is walking into a cross-functional meeting, with at least 40% of the attendees reacting at some point– “I’ve never seen this data before” OR “this data is wrong, because I checked last week and it was something else”. That’s because data and analytics sits in the back-office, and reacts to distributed demands and definitions. If it were in the front office, like revenue and profits, it would be reported correctly 8 out of 10 times.
  • CEO’s Mandate – All professionals, in time, will have basic understanding of data, like they (should) have of English (as a proxy for language of the business) and Mathematics. Till then, however, it needs to be driven like a CEO’s mandate. Will that happen?
  • Data Monetization – All of this pain becomes easier if start monetizing the data itself. Data and Analytics are a cost center. They can be a P&L. Especially, if companies stop being scared of how priceless their data is. It is not. The only thing that makes your data priceless is how it is used. Governance around the usage of data might help companies more than sitting on it and hatching it.

You know one thing that would really help? Knowing when you need help and being candid about it! And – I’ll not get into the psychological reasons (I know better than data), infrastructural reason (our technology and analytics team is not ready for it) or business reasons (it is not a priority at this point) why marketers don’t ask for help.

<First published on linkedin>

 

My first white paper.. on rapid market segmentation.

My first ever White Paper is here titled <!––> Rapid Market Segmentation: Collaborate and Conquer

Download it from the link for a rapid reading. There are some related articles on Diamond’s Analytics blog as well

Let me know what you think.

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